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When is it time?



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 6th 04, 02:29 AM
Cat Dancer
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Default When is it time?

Hi,
My fourteen year old Siamese has undergone biweekly chemotherapy for nasal
lymphoma since June. In the beginning, she seemed to bounce back after
treatment: the positive effects now seem to become increasingly short lived.

I decided to forgo radiation treatment because the side-effects (chronic
sinusitus, conjunctivitus, corneal damage) seemed horrific.

At this point, her appetite remains good and she responds affectionately to
petting and brushing. She has chronic discharge (occasionally bloody) from
her left nostril and eye.
Her upper palate is inflamed. She occasionally has painful reactions to
chewing and swallowing food.

I would appreciate hearing from anybody with experience or advice regarding
pallitive care and when/how to let her go.
Thanks.






  #2  
Old September 6th 04, 03:13 AM
Luvskats00
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You need to watch and monitor for her quality of life. If she appears to be
pain-free and can eat and enjoy her life, great...when she is is pain and can
no longer enjoy the day..it's time to be kind and brave and say goodbye.
  #3  
Old September 6th 04, 03:13 AM
Luvskats00
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You need to watch and monitor for her quality of life. If she appears to be
pain-free and can eat and enjoy her life, great...when she is is pain and can
no longer enjoy the day..it's time to be kind and brave and say goodbye.
  #4  
Old September 6th 04, 03:27 AM
Mary
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"Cat Dancer" wrote in message
...
Hi,
My fourteen year old Siamese has undergone biweekly chemotherapy for nasal
lymphoma since June. In the beginning, she seemed to bounce back after
treatment: the positive effects now seem to become increasingly short

lived.

I decided to forgo radiation treatment because the side-effects (chronic
sinusitus, conjunctivitus, corneal damage) seemed horrific.

At this point, her appetite remains good and she responds affectionately

to
petting and brushing. She has chronic discharge (occasionally bloody)

from
her left nostril and eye.
Her upper palate is inflamed. She occasionally has painful reactions to
chewing and swallowing food.

I would appreciate hearing from anybody with experience or advice

regarding
pallitive care and when/how to let her go.
Thanks.


You know your girl better than anyone, I imagine. What does the vet say
about her prognosis? From your post it seems your kitty's condition is
terminal?


  #5  
Old September 6th 04, 03:27 AM
Mary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Cat Dancer" wrote in message
...
Hi,
My fourteen year old Siamese has undergone biweekly chemotherapy for nasal
lymphoma since June. In the beginning, she seemed to bounce back after
treatment: the positive effects now seem to become increasingly short

lived.

I decided to forgo radiation treatment because the side-effects (chronic
sinusitus, conjunctivitus, corneal damage) seemed horrific.

At this point, her appetite remains good and she responds affectionately

to
petting and brushing. She has chronic discharge (occasionally bloody)

from
her left nostril and eye.
Her upper palate is inflamed. She occasionally has painful reactions to
chewing and swallowing food.

I would appreciate hearing from anybody with experience or advice

regarding
pallitive care and when/how to let her go.
Thanks.


You know your girl better than anyone, I imagine. What does the vet say
about her prognosis? From your post it seems your kitty's condition is
terminal?


  #6  
Old September 6th 04, 05:11 AM
John Ross Mc Master
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Default

On Sun, 5 Sep 2004 21:29:39 -0400, "Cat Dancer"
wrote:

Hi,
My fourteen year old Siamese has undergone biweekly chemotherapy for nasal
lymphoma since June. In the beginning, she seemed to bounce back after
treatment: the positive effects now seem to become increasingly short lived.

I decided to forgo radiation treatment because the side-effects (chronic
sinusitus, conjunctivitus, corneal damage) seemed horrific.

At this point, her appetite remains good and she responds affectionately to
petting and brushing. She has chronic discharge (occasionally bloody) from
her left nostril and eye.
Her upper palate is inflamed. She occasionally has painful reactions to
chewing and swallowing food.

I would appreciate hearing from anybody with experience or advice regarding
pallitive care and when/how to let her go.
Thanks.

When she's suffering so much that you have to kill her, as the lesser
of two evils, then it's time for her to go. Until then, rage against
the dying of the light.





  #7  
Old September 6th 04, 05:11 AM
John Ross Mc Master
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 5 Sep 2004 21:29:39 -0400, "Cat Dancer"
wrote:

Hi,
My fourteen year old Siamese has undergone biweekly chemotherapy for nasal
lymphoma since June. In the beginning, she seemed to bounce back after
treatment: the positive effects now seem to become increasingly short lived.

I decided to forgo radiation treatment because the side-effects (chronic
sinusitus, conjunctivitus, corneal damage) seemed horrific.

At this point, her appetite remains good and she responds affectionately to
petting and brushing. She has chronic discharge (occasionally bloody) from
her left nostril and eye.
Her upper palate is inflamed. She occasionally has painful reactions to
chewing and swallowing food.

I would appreciate hearing from anybody with experience or advice regarding
pallitive care and when/how to let her go.
Thanks.

When she's suffering so much that you have to kill her, as the lesser
of two evils, then it's time for her to go. Until then, rage against
the dying of the light.





  #8  
Old September 12th 04, 06:30 AM
-L. :
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Default

"Cat Dancer" wrote in message ...
Thanks for questions & advice.
Steroids, a new antibiotic, and analgesics apparently have brought her back
from the edge at least for now.

The vet confirmed that the tumor has stopped responding to chemo.


This link might help you know when it is time:
http://angelshavenhere.homestead.com...edecision.html

Best of luck to you,
-L.
  #9  
Old September 12th 04, 06:30 AM
-L. :
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Cat Dancer" wrote in message ...
Thanks for questions & advice.
Steroids, a new antibiotic, and analgesics apparently have brought her back
from the edge at least for now.

The vet confirmed that the tumor has stopped responding to chemo.


This link might help you know when it is time:
http://angelshavenhere.homestead.com...edecision.html

Best of luck to you,
-L.
 




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