A cat forum. CatBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » CatBanter forum » Cat Newsgroups » Cat health & behaviour
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

The meat industry



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old December 30th 03, 12:56 AM
GAUBSTER2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

From: "Barb"

You wouldn't call one cow an outbreak?


No sane person would think that one of anything is an "outbreak".


  #24  
Old December 30th 03, 04:55 AM
MacCandace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

What I'd like to know, but will probably never find out, is how this cow got
into the food chain in the first place, and why only after it got there, did
someone decide to raise a flag??

Judy

The way I understood it from what I read is that this was a dairy cow and the
only reason it was slaughtered is because it was ill and stumbling around. Now
that's what's really scary. A sick cow such as this is referred to as a
"downer" cow and only 10 percent of downer cows that are slaughtered are tested
so, conceivably, this could be a much huger problem. But really, how gross, to
pick a sick cow and purposely slaughter it and then have it sliced up and
rendered? Yuk.

Candace
(take the litter out before replying by e-mail)

See my cats:
http://photos.yahoo.com/maccandace

"One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other
than human." (Loren Eisely)
  #25  
Old December 30th 03, 04:55 AM
MacCandace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

What I'd like to know, but will probably never find out, is how this cow got
into the food chain in the first place, and why only after it got there, did
someone decide to raise a flag??

Judy

The way I understood it from what I read is that this was a dairy cow and the
only reason it was slaughtered is because it was ill and stumbling around. Now
that's what's really scary. A sick cow such as this is referred to as a
"downer" cow and only 10 percent of downer cows that are slaughtered are tested
so, conceivably, this could be a much huger problem. But really, how gross, to
pick a sick cow and purposely slaughter it and then have it sliced up and
rendered? Yuk.

Candace
(take the litter out before replying by e-mail)

See my cats:
http://photos.yahoo.com/maccandace

"One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other
than human." (Loren Eisely)
  #26  
Old December 30th 03, 05:15 AM
Cheryl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

MacCandace wrote in on
29 Dec 2003:

What I'd like to know, but will probably never find out, is how
this cow got into the food chain in the first place, and why only
after it got there, did someone decide to raise a flag??

Judy

The way I understood it from what I read is that this was a dairy cow
and the only reason it was slaughtered is because it was ill and
stumbling around. Now that's what's really scary. A sick cow such as
this is referred to as a "downer" cow and only 10 percent of downer
cows that are slaughtered are tested so, conceivably, this could be a
much huger problem. But really, how gross, to pick a sick cow and
purposely slaughter it and then have it sliced up and rendered? Yuk.


And according to the USDA and their "emotional" response to BSE they issued
this FAQ

What actions are taken at USDA-inspected slaughter establishments to ensure
that cattle with neurological disease would not enter the human food
supply?

All cattle presented for slaughter in the United States are inspected
before slaughter by FSIS for signs of CNS impairment. Any animals
exhibiting neurologic signs during this inspection are condemned, and the
meat is not permitted for use as human food. The brains from these animals
are submitted to USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories for
analysis.
http://aphisweb.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/i...-overview.html


--
Cheryl

"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I
can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do."
- Helen Keller
  #27  
Old December 30th 03, 05:15 AM
Cheryl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

MacCandace wrote in on
29 Dec 2003:

What I'd like to know, but will probably never find out, is how
this cow got into the food chain in the first place, and why only
after it got there, did someone decide to raise a flag??

Judy

The way I understood it from what I read is that this was a dairy cow
and the only reason it was slaughtered is because it was ill and
stumbling around. Now that's what's really scary. A sick cow such as
this is referred to as a "downer" cow and only 10 percent of downer
cows that are slaughtered are tested so, conceivably, this could be a
much huger problem. But really, how gross, to pick a sick cow and
purposely slaughter it and then have it sliced up and rendered? Yuk.


And according to the USDA and their "emotional" response to BSE they issued
this FAQ

What actions are taken at USDA-inspected slaughter establishments to ensure
that cattle with neurological disease would not enter the human food
supply?

All cattle presented for slaughter in the United States are inspected
before slaughter by FSIS for signs of CNS impairment. Any animals
exhibiting neurologic signs during this inspection are condemned, and the
meat is not permitted for use as human food. The brains from these animals
are submitted to USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories for
analysis.
http://aphisweb.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/i...-overview.html


--
Cheryl

"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I
can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do."
- Helen Keller
  #28  
Old December 30th 03, 05:26 AM
Cheryl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Meghan Noecker wrote in on 29 Dec 2003:

On 30 Dec 2003 04:15:07 GMT, Cheryl
wrote:

What actions are taken at USDA-inspected slaughter establishments to
ensure that cattle with neurological disease would not enter the human
food supply?

All cattle presented for slaughter in the United States are inspected
before slaughter by FSIS for signs of CNS impairment. Any animals
exhibiting neurologic signs during this inspection are condemned, and
the meat is not permitted for use as human food. The brains from these
animals are submitted to USDA's National Veterinary Services
Laboratories for analysis.
http://aphisweb.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/i...-overview.html



Then how do they explain downer cows being used in Western Washington?
They can't walk. How can they be approved?


Exactly.



--
Cheryl

"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I
can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do."
- Helen Keller
  #29  
Old December 30th 03, 05:26 AM
Cheryl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Meghan Noecker wrote in on 29 Dec 2003:

On 30 Dec 2003 04:15:07 GMT, Cheryl
wrote:

What actions are taken at USDA-inspected slaughter establishments to
ensure that cattle with neurological disease would not enter the human
food supply?

All cattle presented for slaughter in the United States are inspected
before slaughter by FSIS for signs of CNS impairment. Any animals
exhibiting neurologic signs during this inspection are condemned, and
the meat is not permitted for use as human food. The brains from these
animals are submitted to USDA's National Veterinary Services
Laboratories for analysis.
http://aphisweb.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/i...-overview.html



Then how do they explain downer cows being used in Western Washington?
They can't walk. How can they be approved?


Exactly.



--
Cheryl

"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I
can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do."
- Helen Keller
  #30  
Old December 30th 03, 05:11 PM
GAUBSTER2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Then how do they explain downer cows being used in Western Washington?
They can't walk. How can they be approved?


Exactly.


Um, maybe somebody didn't follow the rules? Just because a piece of paper says
something, doesn't mean it is always followed. North Korea Nuke Treaty
advocated by Clinton? Your local speed limits?
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Before commercial cat food..... Kitten M Cat health & behaviour 716 October 18th 03 02:04 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 CatBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.